EFFECTIVENESS OF COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH EDUCATION ON PREPAREDNESS FOR FLOOD-RELATED COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN KELANTAN

  • Wan Mohd Zahiruddin Wan Mohammad School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Wan Nor Arifin Wan Mansor School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Noor Aman A Hamid School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Surianti Sukeri School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Habsah Hasan School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Lee Yeong Yeh School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Alwi Muhd Besari School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Nani Draman School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Rosnani Zakaria School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
  • Zeehaida Mohamed School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.
Keywords: communicable diseases, knowledge, attitude, community trial, flood

Abstract

The flood disaster in Kelantan in 2014 had resulted in substantial health implications including increased cases of communicable diseases. There was a lack of community preparedness including customized health educations in the prevention and control of flood-related communicable diseases in the affected areas. The research was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based health education modules on flood-related communicable diseases among communities in Kelantan. Health education modules focusing on major food-related diseases were developed.  A non-randomized community-controlled trial using the modules were conducted. Outcomes were assessed on knowledge, attitude and preventive practice scores to flood-related communicable diseases using a pre-validated questionnaire. Independent t test was used to compare mean scores between the intervention community (Tumpat) and the control community (Bachok) at 1-month post intervention. One-way independent ANOVA test was done to compare score differences at baseline (pre), post 1-month and post 2-month from repeated surveys among random samples within the intervention community. There were significant improvements in all knowledge components from 9.4% to 52.6% with 10% increment in attitude scores toward preventing behaviours on flood-related communicable diseases.  When compared against the control community at one-month post-intervention, there were significantly higher knowledge on types of diseases, symptoms and risk factors as well as practice scores of drinking safe water and protective habits. This research demonstrated that community-based health education is effective in improving relevant knowledge, attitude and preventive practices among affected communities as part of their preparedness toward communicable diseases related to flood.

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Published
2020-12-31
How to Cite
Wan Mohammad, W. M. Z., Wan Mansor, W. N. A., A Hamid, N. A., Sukeri, S., Hasan, H., Yeong Yeh, L., Muhd Besari, A., Draman, N., Zakaria , R., & Zeehaida Mohamed. (2020). EFFECTIVENESS OF COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH EDUCATION ON PREPAREDNESS FOR FLOOD-RELATED COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN KELANTAN. Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine, 20(3), 117-124. https://doi.org/10.37268/mjphm/vol.20/no.3/art.647